March 04, 2018 – Cleansing our temples, for mission’s sake

3rd Sunday in Lent, Year B

NB: This homily was used at the Masses that did not involve a Scrutiny

Readings – English / Español

Featured image found here.

 

English

If this homily is any indication, over the next few months my preaching is going to become insufferable. You see, I have asked the Pastoral Council to join me in reading a series of books on parish identity and mission, so these topics are going to be percolating in my brain for a while, and that means you are going to have to deal with it. Sorry not sorry.

So the question for today is “why are we here?” Not, like, Philosophy 101 what is the purpose of life. I mean why are we here as a parish. Why do we bother maintaining a building, paying a priest and staff, having programs and choirs and Masses? What is the point of all of this? I mean, maybe this is just the first year stress talking, but keeping a parish running is really hard, and a lot of people give a lot of time and money to this parish, so we had better have a good reason for keeping it around.

So take a moment. [short pause] Ask yourself the question of “What is the point of our parish?” “Why do we exist?” [long pause] No pressure. [long pause] There is only one right answer, but no pressure. [long pause]

The answer you are looking for, the right answer, the answer I hope more than one person came up with is this: Our parish exists to preach the Gospel. That is it. That is our mission statement. To preach the Gospel. Yes, there are many aspects to this: the sacraments give us a direct experience and participation in the Gospel, while building community and serving the poor allow us to live in response to the Gospel. But ultimately nothing we do matters if it does not serve to preach the Gospel. If our programs and activities do not preach the Gospel, or distract us from preaching the Gospel, or take resources away from more direct and effective methods of preaching the Gospel, then these programs should be immediately abandoned, forgotten, and, dare I say?, burned with fire!

However, lest we think that it is merely a generic parish responsibility to preach the Gospel, which is just another way of saying that the priests and the staff and the “super volunteers” ought to do it, remember that the most basic definition of the Church is the community of the baptized. Every single one of us in this building, on the day of our baptism, was given the sacred and solemn imperative to preach the Gospel. It is a mission that cannot be escaped, cannot be delegated, and cannot be ignored. The purpose of our faith, of our parish, and of our Church is nothing more and nothing less than to preach the Gospel.

And what is the Gospel again? In this context, “Gospel” does not refer to the accounts of Jesus’ life in the New Testament. Instead, preaching the Gospel means preaching the “kerygma”, that is, the original proclamation of the Good News by the Apostles. There are many versions of this kerygma in the New Testament, but for today, let’s focus on the kerygmatic proclamation given to us in the verse sung before the Gospel reading: “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might have eternal life.” This is the Good News, the Gospel, in one sentence.

—-

God’s eternal and infinite love. His offer of his only son for our sake. The possibility of eternal life. Just hearing these ideas should change us. Dwelling on them should inspire us. Understanding them should re-center our entire lives around them. The more we understand what God has done, the more we should feel the same zeal that Jesus felt in the Temple today.

There are many different ways to interpret Jesus’ cleansing of the Temple, but the most convincing explanation that I have heard is that the Lord’s objection to the merchants was less about economics and more about their location. After all, sheep, oxen, and money changers were necessary to fulfill the prescriptions of the Law. Instead, the problem was that the merchants had established themselves in a part of the Temple called the “Court of the Gentiles”. The Temple was built with many different courts, starting with the Holy of Holies into which only the high priest could enter. Out from that was the court of the priests, then the court of men, then the court of the women, then the court of the Gentiles.

So why would there be a place for Gentiles at the Jewish Temple? Ultimately, it is because the mission of Israel was supposed to be to convert the nations. The holiness of the Jewish people, their nearness to God, and the blessings they received for their fidelity were supposed to show forth the glory of God and convert the nations. So there had to be a Court of the Gentiles, because the Gentiles, too, needed a place to come and experience and even worship the God of Israel.

Which is why the Lord drove out the merchants. Having merchants in the Court of the Gentiles represented a two-fold defeat. First, it showed that the Jews had forgotten their primary mission and had forgotten even the possibility that the Gentiles might need a place to worship. Second, the fact that their mission was abandoned for the sake of even more merchants focused on sacrifice showed that the Jews had become too focused on maintaining the law and the sacrifices rather than remembering the purpose of the law and the sacrifices.

This, my friends, is the perfect analogy for what can go wrong in a Catholic parish. We, too, have rituals. Sacramental rituals, community rituals, programmatic rituals. These rituals are good and maybe even necessary. But how often do we take time and ask ourselves what the purpose of these rituals are? Can we look at each of these rituals and say, “Yes, this activity directly preaches the Gospel of Jesus Christ?” And do we have the courage to burst in, as Jesus did, and upend whatever tables might be standing in the way of our primary mission?

I want to be clear: I am not preaching for or against anything specific here. I do not – yet – have any solid ideas about what programs feed our mission and which need driven out. But I want us to think in these terms. The sole and exclusive mission of our parish is to preach the Gospel. Are we focused on that mission? Are we effective in carrying it out?

—-

Burlington

In this Lenten season, we give special focus to those who will become Catholic during the Easter season through baptism or profession of faith. I want you to pay special attention to these Candidates and Catechumens, to pray for them, hold them in your hearts, and be inspired by them. Because when you look at them, I want you to understand that these people are the fruit of the Church’s mission. Understand that when we preach the Gospel in Burlington, as each of us is personally called to do, then our church will be flooded, flooded with people clamoring to enter our courts and worship our Lord Jesus.

Most of our catechumens this year come from Catholic households and, for whatever reason, were not baptized as infants as the Church would have us do. Good! When the Gospel is preached in Burlington, people get caught up on their sacraments: children get baptized, adults get confirmed, and couples get married. I want twice as many next year, and twice as many the year after that until every Catholic in Burlington is baptized, confirmed, and can receive communion every Sunday.

Some of our catechumens were not raised Catholic and are being baptized for the first time, and we also have candidates who are converting from another faith. Good! When the Gospel is preached in Burlington, people who have never known religion or the sacraments give their lives over to the Lord in a new and fresh way. But I want three times as many converts next year, and ten times as many converts after that, until every single person in our parish boundaries has accepted the Good News of Jesus Christ.

We have been given the greatest and most inconceivable gift possible, the Good News that “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might have eternal life.” Our Church exists to spread this message to every corner of the globe, and our parish exists to preach it right here in Burlington. May we never forget the task that is at hand and may we undertake it with a zeal that increases every day of our lives.

La Conner

In this Lenten season, we give special focus to those who will become Catholic during the Easter season through baptism or profession of faith. In our community we are blessed to have <candidate name> joining the Church this year. I want you to pay special attention to her, to pray for her, to hold her in your hearts, and to be inspired by her. Because when you look at her, I want you to understand that she and all who are on the same journey at parishes all over the world are the fruit of the Church’s mission. Understand that when we preach the Gospel in La Conner, as each of us is personally called to do, then our church will be flooded, flooded with people clamoring to enter our courts and worship our Lord Jesus. When the Gospel is preached in La Conner, people who have never known religion or the sacraments give their lives over to the Lord in a new and fresh way. But I want three times as many converts next year, and ten times as many converts after that, until every single person in our parish boundaries has accepted the Good News of Jesus Christ. This is why we are here. This is why our parish exists.

We have been given the greatest and most inconceivable gift possible, the Good News that “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might have eternal life.” Our Church exists to spread this message to every corner of the globe, and our parish exists to preach it right here in La Conner. May we never forget the task that is at hand and may we undertake it with a zeal that increases every day of our lives.

 

Español

Si esta homilía es alguna indicación, en los próximos meses mi predicación se va a volver insoportable. He pedido al Consejo Pastoral que me en un proceso de leer una serie de libros sobre la identidad y la misión de la parroquia, así que estos temas van a ser filtra en mi cerebro por un tiempo, y eso significa que van a tener que lidiar con ello. Lo siento, no lo siento.

Así que la pregunta para hoy es “¿por qué estamos aquí?” No, como, filosofía básica “Cuál es el propósito de la vida.” Quiero decir, ¿por qué estamos aquí como una parroquia? ¿Por qué nos molestamos en mantener un edificio, pagar a un sacerdote y al personal, tener programas, coros y Misas? ¿Qué sentido tiene todo esto? Quiero decir, tal vez esto es sólo el primer año de estrés hablando, pero mantener una parroquia corriendo es muy difícil, y un montón de gente da mucho tiempo y dinero a esta parroquia, así que es mejor tener una buena razón para mantenerlo alrededor.

Así que tómense un momento. [pausa corta] Pregúntense a ustedes mismos la pregunta de “¿Cuál es el propósito de nuestra parroquia?” “¿Por qué existimos?” [pausa larga] No hay presión. [pausa larga] Sólo hay una respuesta correcta, pero no hay presión. [pausa larga]

La respuesta que buscan, la respuesta correcta, la respuesta que espero que más de una persona haya surgido es esta: nuestra parroquia existe para predicar el Evangelio. Eso es. Esa es nuestra declaración de misión. Para predicar el Evangelio. Sí, hay muchos aspectos a este respecto: los sacramentos nos dan una experiencia directa y participación en el Evangelio, mientras construyendo comunidad y sirviendo a los pobres nos permiten vivir en respuesta al Evangelio. Pero en última instancia, nada de lo que hacemos importa si no sirve para predicar el Evangelio. Si nuestros programas y actividades no predican el Evangelio, o nos distraen de predicar el Evangelio, o quitan recursos de métodos más directos y efectivos para predicar el Evangelio, entonces estos programas deben ser inmediatamente abandonados, olvidados, y, quemados con fuego.

Sin embargo, para que no pensemos que es simplemente una responsabilidad genérica de la parroquia predicar el Evangelio, que es sólo otra manera de decir que los sacerdotes y el personal y los “súper voluntarios” deberían hacerlo, recuerden que la definición más básica de la iglesia es la comunidad de los bautizados. Cada uno de nosotros en este edificio, en el día de nuestro bautismo, se le dio el imperativo sagrado y solemne para predicar el Evangelio. Es una misión que no puede ser escapada, no puede ser delegada, y no puede ser ignorada. El propósito de nuestra fe, de nuestra parroquia, y de nuestra iglesia no es nada más y nada menos que predicar el Evangelio.

¿Y cuál es el Evangelio de nuevo? En este contexto, el “evangelio” no se refiere a las narraciones de la vida de Jesús en el nuevo testamento. En cambio, “predicar el Evangelio” significa predicar el “kerigma”, es decir, la proclamación original de la buena nueva por los apóstoles. Hay muchas versiones de este kerigma en el nuevo testamento, pero para hoy, concentrémonos en la proclamación kerigmática que se nos ha dado en el versículo cantado antes de la lectura del Evangelio: ” Tanto amó Dios al mundo, que le entregó a su Hijo único, para que todo el que crea en él tenga vida eterna.” Esta es la buena noticia, el Evangelio, en una frase.

—-

El amor eterno e infinito de Dios. Su ofrecimiento de su único hijo por nuestro bien. La posibilidad de la vida eterna. Sólo escuchar estas ideas nos debe cambiar. Morar en ellos debe inspirarnos. Entenderlos debe recentrar toda nuestra vida. Cuanto más entendamos lo que Dios ha hecho, más debemos sentir el mismo celo que Jesús sintió en el templo hoy.

Hay muchas maneras diferentes de interpretar la purificación de Jesús del templo, pero la explicación más convincente que he escuchado es que la objeción del Señor a los mercaderes era menos sobre la economía y más sobre su ubicación. Después de todo, las ovejas, los bueyes, y los cambiadores de dinero eran necesarios cumplir las prescripciones de la ley. En cambio, el problema era que los mercaderes se habían establecido en una parte del templo llamado el “Patio de los Gentiles”. El templo fue construido con muchos patios diferentes, comenzando con el Santo de los Santos en el que sólo el sumo sacerdote podía entrar. A partir de ahí estaba el patio de los sacerdotes, luego el patio de los hombres, luego el patio de las mujeres, luego el patio de los gentiles.

Entonces, ¿por qué habría un lugar para los gentiles en el templo judío? En última instancia, es porque se suponía que la misión de Israel era convertir a las naciones. Se suponía que la santidad del pueblo judío, su cercanía a Dios, y las bendiciones que recibían por su fidelidad, mostraban la gloria de Dios y convertía a las naciones. Así que tenía que haber un patio de los gentiles, porque los gentiles también necesitaban un lugar para venir y experimentar e incluso adorar al Dios de Israel.

Por eso el Señor expulsó a los mercaderes. Tener mercaderes en el patio de los gentiles representó una derrota doble. En primer lugar, demostró que los judíos habían olvidado su misión principal y habían olvidado incluso la posibilidad de que los gentiles pudieran necesitar un lugar para adorar. En segundo lugar, el hecho de que su misión fuera abandonada por el bien de más comerciantes centrados en el sacrificio mostró que los judíos se habían centrado demasiado en mantener la ley y los sacrificios en lugar de recordar el propósito de la ley y los sacrificios.

Esto, amigos míos, es una analogía perfecta para lo que puede salir mal en una parroquia católica. Nosotros también tenemos rituales. Rituales sacramentales, rituales comunitarios, rituales programáticos. Estos rituales son buenos y quizás incluso necesarios. Pero ¿con qué frecuencia tomamos tiempo y nos preguntamos cuál es el propósito de estos rituales? ¿Podemos mirar cada uno de estos rituales y decir, “sí, esta actividad predica directamente el Evangelio de Jesucristo?” ¿Y tenemos el coraje de irrumpir, como lo hizo Jesús, y desmienten cualesquiera que sean las mesas que se interponen en el camino de nuestra misión primaria?

Quiero ser claro: no estoy predicando a favor o en contra de algo específico aquí. Todavía no tengo ideas sólidas sobre qué programas alimentan nuestra misión y cuáles necesitan ser expulsados. Pero quiero que pensemos en estos términos. La única y exclusiva misión de nuestra parroquia es predicar el Evangelio. ¿Estamos concentrados en esa misión? ¿Somos eficaces para llevarlo a cabo?

—-

En esta temporada cuaresmal, damos especial atención a aquellos que se convertirán en católicos durante la temporada de Pascua a través del bautismo o la profesión de fe. Quiero que presten especial atención a estos candidatos y catecúmenos, que oren por ellos, que los mantengan en sus corazones, y que sean inspirados por ellos. Porque cuando los miras, quiero que entiendas que estas personas son el fruto de la misión de la iglesia. Entienda que cuando predicamos el evangelio en Burlington, como cada uno de nosotros es llamado personalmente a hacer, entonces nuestra iglesia será inundada, inundada de gente clamando a entrar en nuestros patios y adorar a nuestro Señor Jesús.

La mayoría de nuestros catecúmenos este año provienen de hogares católicos y, por cualquier razón, no fueron bautizados como infantes como la Iglesia nos haría hacer. Bien! Cuando el Evangelio se predica en Burlington, la gente alcanza sus sacramentos: los niños se bautizan, los adultos se confirman y las parejas se casan. Quiero el doble del año que viene, y el doble del año siguiente hasta que cada católico en Burlington sea bautizado, confirmado, y pueda recibir la comunión todos los domingos.

Algunos de nuestros catecúmenos no fueron criados católicos y están siendo bautizados por primera vez, y también tenemos candidatos que se están convirtiendo de otra fe. Buena! Cuando el Evangelio se predica en Burlington, las personas que nunca han conocido la religión o los sacramentos entregan sus vidas al Señor de una manera nueva y fresca. Pero quiero tres veces más conversos el próximo año, y diez veces más conversos después de eso, hasta que cada persona en nuestras fronteras de la parroquia haya aceptado las buenas nuevas de Jesucristo.

Se nos ha dado el regalo más grande e inconcebible posible, la buena noticia de que ” Tanto amó Dios al mundo, que le entregó a su Hijo único, para que todo el que crea en él tenga vida eterna.” Nuestra Iglesia existe para difundir este mensaje a cada rincón del mundo, y nuestra parroquia existe para predicarlo aquí mismo en Burlington. Que nunca olvidemos la tarea que está a la mano y que la emprendemos con un celo que aumente cada día de nuestras vidas.

Join the Discussion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s